Beyond Digital Humanities:

How computational methods are reshaping scholarly research

Presentation

On 4 September, the ENP-China project (IrAsia Research Institute) is organizing a one-day international workshop to address, question, and challenge the “Digital Humanities” movement. After almost two decades since its inception as an expression, it is time to place this whole concept in perspective. The workshop will start with a position paper by Cécile Armand and Christian Henriot to open a debate and introduce the presentations by a mixed group of scholars, at the intersection of computing science and humanities.

In the last decades, the Digital Humanities (DH) movement has swept the academic landscape in the United States, offering innovative intersections between digital tools and traditional humanities. More recently, in Europe and China, DH has become a new mantra. However, we argue that the real transformative power transcends the broad DH label, rooted in the depth and specificity of computational methodologies. By critically examining examples drawn from disciplines like history, literature, and sociology, we highlight how computational methods offer both macroscopic and microscopic insights, reshaping the very essence of research. The future beckons not a supersession of traditional methods, but a harmonious integration, championing methodological rigor and critical digital literacy.

Program & Access

The detailed program including the paper abstracts and the participants’ short biographies can be downloaded here.

The workshop will take place in-person at Le Cube building (room 201) and online (please register on Eventbrite)

 

Program

Christian Henriot & Cécile Armand, Aix-Marseille UniversityBeyond the Digital Humanities: A Position paper

Pierre Magistry, INALCO

Beyond the optimism around huge foundation models in machine learning

Shih-Pei Chen, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Fenye by the Numbers: A Quantitative Analysis of Astrological Contents in Chinese Local Gazetteers

Baptiste Blouin, Aix-Marseille University

Bridging NLP and DH: Beyond metrics to meaning

Lena Henningsen, Freiburg University

Reading Practices in the People’s Republic of China: Digital Tools developed by the ReadChina Project

Christian Henriot, Aix-Marseille University

Eminent Chinese of the Shenbao: How to ‘read’ 50,525 newspaper articles

Jiang Jie, Shanghai Normal University

Origin, Genres, and Achievements: The Development of Digital History in Mainland China (2000-2023)

In the last decades, the Digital Humanities (DH) movement has swept the academic landscape in the United States, offering innovative intersections between digital tools and traditional humanities. More recently, in Europe and China, DH has become a new mantra. However, we argue that the real transformative power transcends the broad DH label, rooted in the depth and specificity of computational methodologies. By critically examining examples drawn from disciplines like history, literature, and sociology, we highlight how computational methods offer both macroscopic and microscopic insights, reshaping the very essence of research. The future beckons not a supersession of traditional methods, but a harmonious integration, championing methodological rigor and critical digital literacy.


OpenEdition suggests that you cite this post as follows:
Christian Henriot (August 28, 2023). Beyond Digital Humanities: Elites, Networks and Power in modern China. Retrieved July 21, 2024 from https://doi.org/10.58079/o8mp


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search