Our team

The ENEP-China ERC project brings together scholars and engineers from a wide array of disciplines (history, computing, linguistics/NLP, data science) and from various institutions and research centers. One for the ambitions of the project was to form an international and transdisciplinary research team to tackle the challenging issues at the core of the project.

Core members

Christian Henriot (P.I.), Aix-Marseille University, Institut de recherches asiatiques (Irasia), historian – Site Virtual Shanghai

Christian Henriot is Professor of modern Chinese history at Aix-Marseille University, a former Junior (1994-1999) and Senior Research Fellow at the Institut Universitaire de France (2007-2012), and the recipient of a Humboldt Research Award (2013). He is the author and editor of many books on modern Chinese history, including Prostitution and Sexuality in Shanghai. A Social History, 1849-1949 (Cambridge UP, 2001), In the Shadow of the Rising Sun. Shanghai under Japanese Occupation (Cambridge UP, 2004) and Visualizing China (Brill, 2012), Scythe and the city. A social history of death in Shanghai (1865-1965) (Stanford  UP, 2016) and The population of Shanghai (1865-1953). A source book (Brill, 2018). Henriot is also the creator of a digital research and resource platform on Shanghai history (http://virtualshanghai.net).

Cécile Armand, Aix-Marseille University, Institut de recherches asiatiques (Irasia), postdoctoral fellow, historian – Site MadSpace

Cécile Armand is a postdoctoral scholar in History. She recently received a Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Chiang Ching-kuo Fellowship (2018), following a Mellon postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University (2017-2018). Armand completed her PhD at ENS Lyon on the spatial history of advertising in modern Shanghai (1905-1949). Her current research investigates the emergence of consumer societies and market cultures in modern China. Her contribution to the project consists in tracing the birth of a new brand of market professionals and experts – both Chinese and foreign, at the intersection of business, advertising, journalism, economic institutions and social sciences. She will examine how these hybrid elites cooperated or competed in shaping market and consumer cultures in modern China. She relies on a wide range of primary sources and the combined use  of various digital technologies (databases, SNA, GIS, textual analysis and machine learning).

Patrice Bellot, Aix-Marseille University, Laboratoire d’informatique & systèmes (LIS), computer scientist

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, vim ad facete indoctum, vel errem dolore impedit ne, sea ne vide dicunt. Ludus nihil per no, usu an fuisset constituto. Mea mundi albucius salutandi ex. Omnis dicunt democritum eam id, pro ei exerci quodsi necessitatibus, tantas liberavisse ea vis. Qui sumo tantas cetero ex, inani sanctus quaestio ut quo.

Ne alia clita repudiandae mei. Nec quaeque alterum ei, quo amet verterem cu, sit nobis laboramus ei. Magna alienum eos te, eu sea fuisset antiopam interesset. Qui decore convenire ullamcorper ea, sit agam vivendum in. Inermis ponderum vel ea, pro ut doctus electram.

Julie Chiang (蔣慈暉), Aix-Marseille University, Institut de recherches asiatiques (Irasia), project coordinator.

Tsyr Huei (Julie) CHIANG (蔣慈暉), assistant coordinator of the Erasmus Mundus MULTI program (2010-2015). Coming from a business background, she had experiences in logistics and pricing structures while working in Austin, TX (2000-2006). In her free time, she enjoys playing music, badminton, and being a boardgame geek.

Peter Cornwell, University of Westminster, media theorist

Cornwell is Professor at Institute of Modern and Contemporary Culture, University of Westminster and Research Fellow at Institut d’Asie Orientale ENS-Lyon. He is currently European co-chair of the Research Data Alliance’s (RDA) Preservation Techniques, Technologies and Policies group and director of the Data Futures project – a consortium including Basel, Heidelberg, CERN, Oxford and Princeton and Westminster universities, which works on sustainability problems in digital humanities. After studying art history, electronics and computing science and research in parallel computing he became head of European R&D for Texas Instruments Industrial Division. He has since been director of several European and U.S. companies and founder of California IPO Division, as well as being a key member of OSI and OpenGL standards development teams. Cornwell will advise the project on data aggregation, repository and analysis preservation strategies

Jean-Pierre Dedieu, CNRS, Institut d’Asie Orientale, programming historian – Site Fichoz

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, vim ad facete indoctum, vel errem dolore impedit ne, sea ne vide dicunt. Ludus nihil per no, usu an fuisset constituto. Mea mundi albucius salutandi ex. Omnis dicunt democritum eam id, pro ei exerci quodsi necessitatibus, tantas liberavisse ea vis. Qui sumo tantas cetero ex, inani sanctus quaestio ut quo.

Ne alia clita repudiandae mei. Nec quaeque alterum ei, quo amet verterem cu, sit nobis laboramus ei. Magna alienum eos te, eu sea fuisset antiopam interesset. Qui decore convenire ullamcorper ea, sit agam vivendum in. Inermis ponderum vel ea, pro ut doctus electram.

Benoît Favre, Aix-Marseille University, Laboratoire d’informatique & systèmes (LIS), computer scientist

Benoit Favre is currently an Associate Professor at Aix-Marseille University since 2010. He obtained his thesis in Computer Science from University of
Avignon in 2007. He was a postdoc at UC Berkeley until 2009 and at University of Le Mans, in France until 2010. He is currently the head of Data Sciences at Laboratoire d’Informatique et Systèmes, and of the Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning master at the CS department of AMU. His research topics are automatic understanding of natural language with a focus on non canonical language such as spontaneous speech, social media and historical texts. He is interested in building the next generation of machine learning systems for natural language processing. He is co-author of more than 100 publications, member of IEEE SPS, IEEE SLTC, ISCA, AFCP.

Feng Yi, CNRS, Institut de recherches asiatiques (Irasia), source analyst & digital designer

Feng YI (馮 藝) is a CNRS (Center National de la Recherche Scientifique) social science engineer who received her education in history at Capital Normal University in Beijing and Lumière-Lyon 2 University (M.A. degree). Feng specialized early in  Chinese historical documentation and sources and contributed to several research projects in modern Chinese history, including innovative research and resource platforms (Taiwan bibliography, Common People and Artist, etc.). She is the editor of Bibliothèque Numérique Asiatique, the digital library of the Institute of Asian Research (IrAsia) and the curator of the Virtual Beijing digital platform. Feng is also involved in designing web interfaces for research (researchers’ blog) and virtual exhibitions. Her most recent project is Everyday life in China, a trilingual virtual exhibition on a rare collection of historical figurines.

Luca Gabbiani, Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient (EFEO), historian

Luca Gabbiani is currently associate professor at the École française d’Extrême-Orient (EFEO, Paris). He has headed the EFEO’s Taipei Center from 2007 to 2011 and the EFEO’s Beijing Center from 2011 to 2016. He presently teaches late imperial Chinese history at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. His main fields of research are late imperial China’s urban and legal history. He has published a book on the history of Beijing city management under the Qing dynasty, Pékin à l’ombre du Mandat céleste. Vie quotidienne et gouvernement urbain sous la dynastie Qing (1644-1911) (Paris, Editions de l’Ehess, 2011) and recently edited a volume on Chinese urban history: Urban Life in China, 15th-20th Centuries (Paris, Editions de l’EFEO, 2016).

Anna Herren, University of Zurich, doctoral fellow – Twitter account

Anna Herren is a doctoral candidate at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, where she obtained her M. A. degree in East Asian Art History and Chinese studies in 2016. Her doctoral research proposal was successfully granted by the Swiss National Science Foundation in 2017 and she is currently conducting her PhD project at the Institute of Art History, Section for East Asian Art History at the University of Zurich. Her thesis is centered on visual representation in newspaper photography on China from 1925 to 1949. By focusing on newspaper photographs which were created for an international audience, the works of newly emerging and internationally connected Chinese and foreign elites in journalism and photojournalism will be analyzed beyond eurocentrism. Her project draws on multiple primary sources, including English- and Chinese-language periodicals published in Shanghai , as well as records preserved in major archives in the United States, Europe, and China.

Lien Ling-ling, Academia Sinica, Institute of Modern History, historian

Ling-ling Lien is Associate Research Fellow in the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica. Her research field is social and cultural history in modern China. She recently published the book, Creating a Paradise for Consumption: Department Stores and Modern Urban Culture (in Chinese, IMH, 2017). She is also the editor of the volume All-Seeing Tabloid Newspapers: Modern Chinese Urban Culture, Society and Politics (in Chinese, IMH, 2013) and the journal Research on Women in Modern Chinese History. She is working on two different projects, one on the daily life of Allied civilians interned in occupied China by the Japanese during WWII, and the other concerning how Chinese intellectuals adopted social survey, a scientific methodology of research, to construct women as a new category of knowledge.

Andréa Carneiro Linhares,  Aix-Marseille University, Institut de recherches asiatiques (Irasia), Computer scientist

Andréa Carneiro Linhares  is a former faculty member of the computer engineering department at the Federal University of Ceará (UFC, Brazil). Linhares completed a PhD in Computer Science at Avignon University (UAPV, France), a research Masters and a bachelor in Computer Science, both in Brazil. In 2012, she did a post doctorate funded by UFC at the Computing Laboratory of Avignon University where she improved her knowledge in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and in Machine Learning. Her experience in Computer Science is focused on Operations Research, working mainly on the following topics: combinatorial optimization, graph and algorithms, automatic summarization (NLP), frequency assignment problems and numerical methods. She has been part of international collaborations since 2010, working on multidisciplinary projects. Her contribution to the project will consist of research, development and coding of new and existing algorithms, tools and technologies to design scientific applications.

Pierre Magistry, Postdoctoral fellow, Aix-Marseille University, Institut de recherches asiatiques (Irasia), Computational Linguist

Pierre Magistry is a postdoctoral researcher in Natural Language Processing with a special interest in Sinitic and low resource languages. He completed his PhD in the ALPAGE team (Paris Diderot – INRIA) in 2013 on Chinese Word Segmentation at the interface of linguistic theories and unsupervised machine learning. His experience benefited from multiple stays in Taiwan (2008-2010, 2014, 2016) under research fundings from TIGP (Academia Sinica), Erasmus Mundus Multi and a Taiwan Fellowship. His work on Taiwanese language led him to release the first input method on mobile devices for this language. In 2017-2018, he was a postdoc at LIMSI (CNRS), working on NLP for low resources situation and developing new semi-supervised learning approaches

Xavier Paulès, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Centre d’études sur la Chine moderne et contemporaine (CECMC), historian

Xavier Paulès is an associate professor at EHESS in Paris. He was the head of the Centre d’études sur la Chine moderne et contemporaine from 2015 to 2018. His last publications in English include Living on borrowed time. Opium in Canton, 1906-1936, Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, and “An illustration of China’s “paradoxical soft power”: the dissemination of the gambling game fantan 番攤 by the Cantonese diaspora, 1850-1950”, Translocal Chinese: East Asian perspectives, vol. 11, no. 2 (Fall 2017), p. 187-207. Paulès is currently conducting research about the history of gambling in China, with a special interest on the game of fantan 番攤.

Laurent Prévot, Aix-Marseille University, Laboratoire Parole et Langage (Dir.), language scientist

Laurent Prévot is a professor in Language Sciences at Aix Marseille Université and the director of Laboratoire Parole et Langage. He is also a junior member of the Institut Universitaire de France (IUF). His specialties are linguistics (in particular semantic and pragmatic questions) and Natural Language Processing. He obtained his PhD (2004) in Computer Science from Toulouse 3 University and worked as post-doc in linguistic and interdisciplinary labs in Italy (Laboratory for Applied Ontology, Trento), France (Syntax and Semantics Research Team CLLE-ERSS, Toulouse 2) and Taiwan (Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica). Since its arrival at AMU (2008), he coordinated an Erasmus Mundus Action 2 mobility program with South East Asia, and had been ‘Humanities and Social Sciences’ Program Manager for France-Taiwan Frontiers of Science. Recently, he has been working on quantitative approaches of conversations and continues to develop a keen interest for Digital Humanities.

Sun Huei-min, Academia Sinica, Institute of Modern History, historian

Sun Huei-min is currently an associate research fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. Her research interests include socio-cultural history, legal history, urban history, and the history of education.  She is the author of Institutional Transplantation: The Chinese Lawyers in Republican Shanghai (1912-1937) (in Chinese, published in 2012), and one of the annotators of The Diaries of Pao T’ien-hsiao (1948-1949) (in Chinese, forthcoming). Based on her long-term studies of legal archives, news reports and personal accounts, she has been tracing the impact of housing problems on the lives of Shanghai’s urban population, especially in terms of public order and legal system attempts to regulate rights pertaining to urban properties.

Katrine Wong, Lumière-Lyon 2 University, doctoral fellow

Katrine Wong is a doctoral candidate at the University Lumière Lyon 2. Her dissertation explores the life of Wang Xiaolai ( 王曉籟 1887-1967), elite merchant and emblematic figure of Republican Shanghai. The thesis traces Wang’s personal and public trajectory  from a  young first-degree imperial xiucai ( 秀才 ) scholar in his native Shengxian (嵊縣) to a leading Republican Shanghai elite merchant. The thesis investigates Wang’s multifaceted personage as a Shanghai capitalist and financier, business magnate and philanthropist  to interrogate how his multiple pivotal roles stood embedded at the very heart of the social, financial, industrial, merchant and business networks of Shanghai. Drawing from a range of archival records preserved in major Chinese, French and U.S. archives, oral history and other primary sources, the dissertation aims to produce a first documented study of this foremost individual of early twentieth century China, and thereby offer a contribution to the lean repertoire of Republican Shanghai biographies.

Wu Jen-shu, Academia Sinica, Institute of Modern History, historian

Wu Jen-shu, (Ph.D., 1996) is a research fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica in Taiwan. He has published several articles and monographs on the social, economic, and cultural history of the Ming and Qing dynasties, including Taste and Extravagance: Late Ming Consumer Society and the Gentry (Taipei, 2007); Good Citizens Turning Rebels: An Analysis of Urban Mass Collective Actions in Traditional China (Beijing, 2011); and Urban Pleasures: Leisure Consumption and Spatial Transformation in Jiangnan Cities during the Ming-Qing Period (Taipei, 2013); and The “Paradise” after Disaster: City Life of Suzhou during the Period of the Anti-Japanese War (Taipei, 2017). He is working on two different projects, one on women’s life in Suzhou city under Japanese occupation during W.W.II, and the other on local consumption and social change in 19th-century China.

Data scientist, Data science: To be announced (position open) Who will it be? Come and join us!